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Central giant cell granuloma differential diagnosis

A case of aggressive multiple metachronous central giant cell granulomas of the jaws: differential diagnosis and management options. Curtis NJ, Walker DM. We describe multiple metachronous central giant cell granulomas in a 62-year-old man who has a first degree relative with a history of a solitary central giant cell granulomas The differential diagnosis comprises central giant cell granuloma, giant cell tumor of bone, and osteitis fibrosa cystica (brown tumor) in combination with hyperparathyroidism. Since these lesions may mimic metastatic bone disease in patients with a history of cancer, a malignant process has to be considered

A case of aggressive multiple metachronous central giant

A 10-year-old boy developed this painless purple papule of the maxillary facial alveolar process over a 3-month period. Biopsy helped confirm the diagnosis of peripheral giant cell granuloma. This peripheral giant cell granuloma involved the maxillary gingiva associated with an erupting central incisor of a 6-year-old girl Central Giant Cell Granuloma • Anterior to First Molars • Mandible > Maxilla • Expansile • Teens, Adults • Periapical location, tooth bearing regions • Treatment - Intralesional Steroids - Curettage • Aggressive Variants recur • R/O Hyperparathyroidis Central giant cell lesions (granulomas), also known as giant cell reparative cysts/granulomas, occurs almost exclusively in the mandible, although cases in the skull and maxilla have been reported Differential Diagnosis in Dermatopathology Granulomas may also have giant cells associated with them and the ones that are classically described are the Toton giant cell where the nuclei are in a circle; the Langerhans giant cell where the nuclei are peripherally placed and in a horseshoe shaped pattern and the foreign body giant cell where.

Also called giant cell reparative granuloma. Central if intraosseous; peripheral if extraosseous. May be due to recurrent slow, minute hemorrhages. Often associated with trauma. Children and young adults, usually females. Lesion appears to be unique to jaw. Usually anterior mandible Differential Diagnosis of Oral Masses Gingival Lesions. Gingival/Alveolar Ridge Masses • Peripheral Odontogenic Tumors • Squamous Cell Carcinoma • Expansile Central Bone Tumors. Parulis • Buccal or Lingual • Odontogenic Source of Infection • Nonvitall Tooth • Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma. Reactive Lesions of the Gingiva. The differential diagnosis may be extensive and can include malignancy, traumatic bone cyst, central giant cell granuloma, and other odontogenic tumors. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor, another locally aggressive, expansile tumor that may be heavily calcified, can strongly resemble an odontogenic myxoma at imaging

This article discusses lesions that commonly present as multilocular radiolucencies and, therefore, should be considered when the clinician is forming a differential diagnosis. These lesions include odontogenic keratocyst, ameloblastoma, central giant cell granuloma, cherubism, odontogenic myxoma, a The differential diagnosis includes ameloblastoma, LCH and central giant cell granuloma. Histopathological diagnosis was of a central giant cell granuloma. 10 public playlist includes this cas Central Giant Cell Granuloma (CGCG) is described as a non-neoplastic condition that can behave like a neoplastic process in its ability to destroy bone and displace teeth. Over 60% of CGCG cases occur in patients younger than 30 years of age, with twice as many occurrences in females as in males MACHO - Myxoma, Ameloblastoma, Central Giant Cell Granuloma, Hemangioma, OKC. differential diagnosis for a periapical radiolucency:Authors. Bhaskar Nair. differential diagnosis for a periapical radiolucency:Bhaskar. no distinction radiographically between cyst and granuloma

Definition / general. Reactive gingival mass resembling pyogenic granuloma, which pushes teeth aside and may erode alveolar bone or involve periodontal membrane. Arises from periodontal ligament enclosing root of tooth. Central giant cell granuloma: similar to peripheral giant cell granuloma but multiloculated Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is described by the World Health Organization as an intraosseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrous tissue that contains multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregations of multinucleated giant cells, and some trabeculae of woven bone [ 1 ] The presence of multiple central giant cell granulomas in the maxillofacial region is rare and is suggestive of hyperparathyroidism, Noonan-like multiple giant cell lesion syndrome, Giant cell tumour, Cherubism or Paget's disease. Multifocal, synchronous CGCGs without any concomitant systemic disease are extremely rare

[Central giant cell granuloma and osteitis fibrosa cystica

Central giant-cell granuloma (CGCG) is a localised benign condition of the jaws. It is twice as common in females and is more likely to occur before age 30. Central giant-cell granulomas are more common in the anterior mandible, often crossing the midline and causing painless swellings Central Giant Cell Granuloma : WHO has defined it as an intraosseous lesion consisting of cellular and fibrous tissue that contains multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregation of multinucleated giant cells and occasionally trabaculae of woven bon

Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma Differential Diagnose

Introduction. Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone was first described by Sir Astley Cooper in 1818 (, 1).Historically, the lesion has been referred to by numerous terms, including myeloid sarcoma, tumor of myeloplaxus, osteoblastoclastoma, and osteoclastoma (, 2-, 5).. GCT is a relatively common skeletal tumor, accounting for 4%-9.5% of all primary osseous neoplasms and 18%-23% of benign bone. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is an uncommon, benign, and proliferative lesion of the jaw with an unknown etiology. It is considered widely to be a nonneoplastic lesion. The actual etiology of CGCG is still unclear, although inflammation, hemorrhage, and local trauma have all been suggested This peripheral giant cell granuloma involved the maxillary gingiva associated with an erupting central incisor of a 6-year-old girl. The referring doctor had suggested a diagnosis of eruption cyst; however, an eruption cyst would immediately collapse once the tooth had disrupted its roof An aggressive central giant cell granuloma of the maxilla: diagnostic dilemma, precise differential diagnosis and successful traditional surgical approach: a case report. Authors . Elmezwghi Abdurahman Musbah Alarabi, Nuri Mustafa Elsagali, Abeer Hussein Mo Zariba, Salma S

  1. Central giant cell granuloma is characterized by benign osteolytic intraosseous lesion producing radiolucent radiographic appearance. The differential diagnosis includes the brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, a multilocular lesion that can compromise the prognosis of these patients. Surgical removal is the gold standard of treatment
  2. Basic diagnostic procedure and difficulties. The differential diagnoses of granulomatous lung disease are listed in table 1.As histological abnormality alone is rarely diagnostic for a specific granulomatous disorder, the diagnostic procedure should focus on precise clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, detection of infectious organisms and radiological evaluation
  3. Numerous giant cell rich lesions of jaws could be considered in the differential diagnosis. These include giant cell tumor, cherubism, aneurysmal bone cyst and jaw tumor of hyperparathyroidism (Venkateshwarlu et al., 2010). ˚ However, aneurysmal bone cyst shows blood-filled cystic cavities. Cherubism is an autosoma
  4. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign non-neoplastic, proliferative intraosseous lesion of the jaw with an unknown etiology often diagnosed during the first two decades of life. The true nature of this lesion is controversial and remains elusive. Here, we report a case of central giant cell granuloma, diagnosed using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)
  5. Falling under the category of a benign aggressive lesion, the central giant cell granuloma is the one that most commonly may present as a periapical radiolucency. 6,14-18 Previously, these lesions were thought to represent a reparative process, hence the original name of central giant cell reparative granuloma. Currently, the etiology for these.
  6. Differential Diagnosis - The 3 P's •Histologically identical to the central giant cell granuloma . Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma - Clinical Features •F>M, 5th and 6th decades •Bluish-purple lesion, exclusively on the gingiva or alveolar ridg
  7. ation, differential diagnosis of odontogenic keratocyst, ameloblastoma, osteosarcoma and central giant cell granuloma were considered. Histopathological evaluation of the excisional biopsy specimen showed the presence of connective stroma containing numerous young fibroblasts as well as.

lesions containing giant cells. •Low grade osteosarcoma •Histologically it is similar to central giant cell granuloma, except the giant cells are larger with more nuclei and more evenly spread out Osteoblastoclastoma (giant cell tumour) is normally found in the long bones and its presence in the jaws is extremely rare Differential diagnosis: Most gingival enlargements and infections may exhibit similar characteristics and must be considered in a differential diagnosis as well. Peripheral giant cell granulomas; Giant cell fibroma; Relative frequency of central odontogenic tumors: A study of 1,088 cases from Northern California and comparison to. A 25-year-old woman presented a unilateral mandibular swelling, after laboratory analysis, radiological studies and aspiration puncture biopsy, the pathological diagnosis of Central Giant Cell Granuloma was made. Radiographically, the multilocular lesion involved the left lower first molar and was 30 mm long by 20 mm high. Dental extraction of the molar involved with forceps and exeresis in.

Nancy W. Burkhart, EdD, BSDH, AFAAOM, discusses the oral pathology of the central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), also known by names such as giant cell lesion, giant cell granuloma, and giant cell tumor. Since hygienists may be the first to detect these lesions on radiographic images, she explains the important characteristics of CGCG lesions This peripheral giant cell granuloma involved the maxillary gingiva associated with an erupting central incisor of a 6-year-old girl. The referring doctor had suggested a diagnosis of eruption cyst; however, an eruption cyst would immediately collapse once the tooth had disrupted its roof The histological aspects pointed to a diagnosis of a central giant cell granuloma which was associated with a benign fibro-osseous lesion, a Fibrous dysplasia. DISCUSSION. Making a differential diagnosis among these BFOLS is very difficult, as these lesions do not present a well defined behaviour. A substantial correlation between the patient. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign bone lesion which can be locally aggressive or may be asymptomatic in nature. In 1953, Jaffe described it as reparative granuloma of jaw bones [ 1 ]. But the term reparative is obsolete, as CGCG causes the destruction of involved bones

Central giant cell lesions (granuloma) Radiology

  1. Differential Diagnosis of Oro Maxillofacial pain-Chart. Oro facial pain is one common cause patients seek dental treatments. It could be simply a local cause like dental caries or any other pathology involving adjacent structures. Other way it could be a psychogenic pain
  2. The central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the jaws is a rare, non neoplastic bone lesion accounting for fewer than 7% of all benign tumors of the jaws. Fibroma can be included in the differential diagnosis when granular internal architecture is present. A small radiolucent CGCG can look similar to a simple bon
  3. 89722009 - Giant cell peripheral granuloma Look For. Subscription Required. Diagnostic Pearls. Subscription Required. Differential Diagnosis & Pitfalls. Lobular capillary hemangioma (pyogenic granuloma) may appear identical although they tend to occur in younger individuals (some who are pregnant) and tends to be brighter red
  4. Central giant cell granuloma Giant cell lesion of hyperparathyroidism Cherubism Odontogenic myxoma Aneurysmal bone cyst Metastatic tumors to the jaws. Variant of soap bubble pattern. Septa radiate from a central body, giving the appearance of a spider. Eg: Ameloblastoma Composed of angular rather than rounded compartments that resul

Differential Diagnosis in Dermatopathology: Granuloma

  1. Differential Diagnosis Other conditions, which must be taken into consideration in the diagnosis of the central giant cell granuloma include Brown tumour of hyperparathyroidism, cherubism, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst and traumatic bone cyst If the lesion is multiloculated, a recent report suggests that in addition to the above.
  2. Central Giant Cell Granuloma is a non-neoplastic intraosseous lesion and constitutes about 10% of benign jawbone lesions. Etiology of the lesion is not well defined. Approximately one-third of The radiological differential diagnosis can include Ameloblastoma, odontogenic keratocyst and Aneurysmal Bone Cyst, an
  3. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is an intraosseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrous tissue that contains multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregations of multinucleated giant cells and occasionally trabeculae of woven bone. CGCG, as described by Jaffe in 1953 is an idiopathic non-neoplastic proliferative lesion. The term reparative giant cell granuloma was at one time widely accepted as.
  4. ations but was histopathologically diagnosed as CGCG

Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the jaws is a benign, intraosseous, osteolytic lesion of debatable etiology. CGCG lacks in clinical and radiographical pathognomonic features to distinguish from common lesions occurring in this region. Histopathology still remains the predominant diagnostic modality to identify the disorder Educational video created by UNMC College of Dentistry Class of 2016 dental students Central giant cell granuloma was first described by Jaffe in 1953. It is an uncommon, benign and proliferative non neoplastic process. The term central giant cell lesion has been proposed as a microscopic feature and not those of a true granulomatous process. The clinical behavior of CGCG of the jaws is variable and difficult to predict Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), also termed as reparative giant cell granuloma, is an uncommon benign intraosseous lesion affecting the maxilla and mandible, which consists of massive fibrohistiocytic proliferation and heavily hemosiderin laden multinucleated giant cells ,.World Health Organization has defined it as an intraosseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrous tissue with.

Which of the following should not be included on the differential diagnosis? Peripheral giant cell granuloma. Mucocele. Pyogenic granuloma. Central giant cell granuloma. Central giant cell granuloma. Pyogenic granuloma. Squamous cell carcinoma. Myofibroma. How is this lesion best managed? Marginal resection expansion and thinning of the cortex may mimic central giant cell granuloma of the mandible and maxilla. The loculations produced by central hemangioma, however, are accompanied by a fine fibrillar network. Aneurysmal bone cyst may be suspected, but radio-graphically this lesion does not resorb the adjacent teeth and lacks the multiple.

Pathology Outlines - Central giant cell granulom

Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a tumor like growth occurring relatively commonly in the oral cavity that represents a reactive process rather than a neop.. Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the jaw bones is a rare benign intraosseous lesions that is commonly seen as indolent lesions in the mandible anterior to the first molar. It is a localized osteolytic lesion with the varied biologic behavior of aggression which affects the jaw bones Peripheral giant cell granuloma, Etiology , Epidemiology, CCD-3-118-g006 , Examination, Histology, Predisposing factor, Differential Diagnosis, Clinical Appearance, Management Peripheral giant cell granuloma Central giant cell granuloma usually is an asymptomatic lesion, which may become evident during routine radiographic examination or as a result of painless but visible expansion of the affected jaw. The clinical differential diagnosis for a solitary or multilocular CGCG includes ameloblastoma, odontogenic myxoma, and odontogenic keratocyst

the differential diagnoses can be narrowed to central giant cell granuloma, cherubism, giant cell tumor of bone, brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism, and giant cell reparative granuloma. What Is the Diagnosis Based on the Clinical and Histopathologic Findings? The diagnosis of giant cell tumor of bone was supported by the morphologic findings in. The central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign lesion of the maxillofacial area. It was first described in 1953 by Jaffe [], and it is defined by the World Health Organization as an intraosseous lesion consisting of cellular fibrous tissue.It contains multiple foci of hemorrhage, aggregations of multinucleated giant cells, and occasionally, trabeculae of woven bone []

Start studying Clinical Principles of Patient Evaluation Exam II - 8280. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools (synonyms: central giant cell lesion, reparative giant cell granuloma) Histology: Localized benign fibroblastic lesion with multi-nucleated giant cells and reactive bone formation (Fig. 7). Epidemiology: Central Giant Cell Granuloma occur most frequently in the second and third decades of life, twice as frequently in women as in men giant cell granuloma: a nonneoplastic lesion characterized by a proliferation of granulation tissue containing numerous multinucleated giant cells; it occurs in the gingiva and alveolar mucosa (occasionally in other soft tissues) where it presents as a soft red-blue hemorrhagic nodular swelling; it also occurs within the mandible or maxilla as.

Differential diagnosis: Dentigerous cyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontogenic myxoma, central giant cell granuloma. Ameloblastoma in the left mandible. Note multilocular and expansile lesion with knife-edge radicular resorption of the molars Differential diagnosis • Giant cell granuloma - usually unilateral , usually affects patients between 20 & 40 yrs. • Fibrous Dysplasia- histological examination of the classic form of fibrous dysplasia reveals trabeculae of immature bone resembling chinese characters within the proliferating stroma. Treatment : generally regress by puberty

Cysts and Cystic Lesions of the Mandible: Clinical and

Multilocular radiolucencies - PubMe

The clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings of a central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) arising in the mandible are depicted. CGCG is a relatively uncommon, benign, cystic, intraosseous lesion that was first described in 1953 Thus, the pathologic diagnosis was central giant cell granuloma. Fig. 3 The biopsy specimen shows several multinucleated giant cells within a background of ovoid and spindle-shaped mesenchymal cells (hematoxylin and eosin staining, magnification×400) Giant cell granuloma was first identified by Jaffe in 1953. Owing to its reparative character, it was called 'reparative central giant cell granuloma'. Nowadays, the term 'reparative' has been deleted. CGCG is generally found more frequently in females than in males, with a ratio of 2:1 [9-11]. While CGCG . Figure 1 The most probable clinicoradiographic diagnosis given was of central giant cell granuloma. The clinicoradiographic differential diagnosis considered was of odontogenic keratocyst, ABC, ameloblastoma, and traumatic bone cyst. Aspiration and incisional biopsy was carried out from the right mandibular premolar-molar region Differential Diagnosis. Giant cell tumor of the jaw: Usually unilateral, and appears in patients between 20 to 40 years of age. Central giant cell granuloma of bone: Mainly affects the anterior mandible, and patients affected are usually between 10 to 30 years of age

Benign tumors of jaw

The Central Giant Cell Granuloma or CGCG is a fibro-osseous lesion which is considered to be reactive in nature by many authors. Here we are attempting to report a case of CGCG which has been given combination therapy. The combination therap RCT are necessary. Dentists should include CGCG in differential diagnosis of lesions that are refractory to endodontic treatment. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):158-60] Keywords: Central Giant Cell Granuloma, Dental Granuloma, Periapical disease, Radicular cyst. Received May 2009; accepted August 200 The challenge in the treatment of central giant cell granuloma ― What is the best approach? Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology. 2017;29:122. Baskaran P, et al. Aggressive central giant cell granuloma of the mandible, a diagnostic dilemma Introduction. In 1953, Jaffe coined the term giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) to discriminate these lesions from giant cell tumor of long bones. 1 He described it as a reactive jaw lesion occurring due to trauma, resulting in intraosseous hemorrhage containing giant cells. Later, the term GCRG was changed to central giant cell granuloma (CGCG). 2, 3 CGCG is a benign, proliferative.

Reparative granuloma and brown tumor of hyperparathyroidism must be included in the differential diagnosis. Here we report the clinical and radiologic findings of a multicentric giant cell tumor with skull base involvement in a female patient. This case report demonstrates the similar pathophysiology of peripheral and central giant cell tumors The differential diagnoses consist of central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), aneurysmal bone cyst, chondroblastoma, hyperparathyroidism and fibrous dysplasia . CGCG is a reactive bone lesion that occurs mainly in the jaws [ 11 ] Central giant cell granulomas are usually confused as other lesions both clinically and radiologically, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only histologically. We report here a rare case of central giant cell granuloma in association with congenitally missing tooth which was misdiagnosed to be an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor both. An aggressive central giant cell granuloma in a pediatric patient: case report and review of literature Yiqiao Wang1, Andre Le2*, Dina El Demellawy3, Mary Shago4,5, Michael Odell2 and Stephanie Johnson-Obaseki2 Abstract Background: Central giant cell granulomas are benign tumours of the mandible, presenting in children and young adults tender to palpation. The differential diagnosis included adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT), central giant cell granuloma, and dentigerous cyst. The panoramic radiograph showed a poorly circumscribed intrabony radiolucency. On cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, a thin cortex of bone surrounded the expansile mass

Central giant cell granuloma Radiology Case

Giant cell granuloma occurs either as a peripheral exophytic lesion on the gingiva or as a centrally located lesion within the jaw, skull, or facial bones . It was first described (by Jaffe) as central giant cell reparative granuloma. True giant cell neoplasms, such as the giant cell tumor that occurs in the humerus and femur, rarely occur in. Characteristics. It is the most common type of pathological radiolucency in the jaw (more than 50%). The lesion is a small round or oval radiolucency, surrounding the apex of a non vital tooth, with or without well-circumscribed borders. The lesion consists of endothelial cells, capillaries, new fibroblasts, a small amount of collagen, chronic. presentations, which of the following should be included on the differential diagnosis? A) Vascular malformation B) Central giant cell granuloma C) Cherubism D) All of the above E) A and B 46. An incisional biopsy of the lesion in question #45 reveals scattered osteoclast-type giant cells set within a cellular fibrovascular stroma Giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) is a rare benign condition of unknown cause occurring most commonly in the mandible. It has also been reported to occur in the long bone, paranasal sinus, orbital region, cranial vault, and temporal bone (1-7).In the English-language medical literature, only a few cases of GCRG of the temporal bone have been described (2, 3, 4-8), and, to our. DD2: Central Giant Cell Granuloma / Dentigerous Cyst DD3: CEOT DD4: Odontogenic myxoma DD5: COC List 4 differential diagnosis you would give for radiolucent lesions associated with the crown of a tooth? 1. Dentigerous cyst 2. Ameloblastoma 3. OKC 4. AOT . List 4 differential diagnosis you would give for radiolucent lesions NOT necessarily.

COM May 2017 Diagnosis - UW School of Dentistr

Giant cells are big cells with multiple nuclei. They come in different flavours, which are suggestive of causality. This article deals with the classic types of giant cells. A more general differential diagnosis of giant cells is in giant cell lesions This finding can also represent an entity unrelated to tooth pathology which presents in a periapical location such as an early lesion of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia, an odontogenic keratocyst, a lateral periodontal cyst, an ameloblastoma, or a central giant cell granuloma Five gingival specimens sam-pled from giant cell epulus, fibrous epulus, central giant cell granuloma, high- and low-differentiated carcinoma were involved in the investigations. Based on literature data, a map was designed/developed, and selected genes of three signal pathways stimu-lated by the IFN-γ complex were marked on the map Central giant cell granuloma CGCG is another giant cell-rich benign bone tumor, and is believed not to be a true neoplasm, but the result of a local reparative reaction [55,70] . CGCG are rare with an estimated incidence of 1.1 per million with most patients aged 10-25 years old [55,71]

Differential Diagnosis Flashcards Quizle

Video: Pathology Outlines - Peripheral giant cell granulom

An aggressive central giant cell granuloma in a pediatric

Central giant cell granuloma of the mandible in a 7-year-old boy: A case report. Autores: Yu-Ju Lin, Hong-San Chen, Hong-Rong Chen, Wen-Chen Wang, Yuk-Kwan Chen, Li-Min Lin Localización: Quintessence International, ISSN-e 0033-6572, Vol. 38, Nº. 3, 2007, págs. 253-259 Idioma: inglés Enlaces. Texto completo; Resumen. Central giant cell granuloma is a relatively uncommon benign bony lesion. Central giant cell granuloma synonyms, Central giant cell granuloma pronunciation, Central giant cell granuloma translation, English dictionary definition of Central giant cell granuloma. n. pl. gran·u·lo·mas or gran·u·lo·ma·ta Any of various nodular masses of granulocytic monocytes and other immune cells, including macrophages and.. It represents approximately 3 - 6% of all odontogenic tumors. It is painless and grows slowly. It can occur at any age but most commonly in the second and third decades of life. More often affects the mandible (molar/premolar region). Typically multilocular. The internal septa are thin and straight forming a tennis racket or honeycomb appearance Central giant cell lesions (granulomas), also known as giant cell reparative cysts/granulomas, occurs almost exclusively in the mandible, although cases in the skull and maxilla have been reported. Epidemiology. It is most frequently seen in young women (F:M 2:1) and typically presents in the 2 and 3 decades

Endodontic misdiagnosis of periapical central giant cell

Nonsyndromic Synchronous Multifocal Central Giant Cell

Nasopalatine duct cyst was described by Meyer for the first time in 1914. 1,2 This cyst is the most common non-odontogenic, developmental-evolutionary cyst of the oral cavity 3 and is also known as the incisive canal cyst, anterior palatine cyst and the median anterior maxillary cyst. 4 It is believed that this cyst can be originated from the epithelial remains of the nasopalatine duct. 3,5. Biopsy helped confirm the diagnosis of peripheral giant cell granuloma. A 10-year-old boy developed this painless purple papule of the maxillary facial alveolar process over a 3-month period. This peripheral giant cell granuloma involved the maxillary gingiva associated with an erupting central incisor of a 6-year-old girl FIGURE 16-24 A, Nonaggressive central giant cell granuloma. Panoramic radiograph shows radiolucency at the apex of right mandibular second molar. B, Aggressive central giant cell granuloma. Recurrent tumor of right maxilla involving maxillary and ethmoid sinuses and nasal cavity

Solitary bone cyst of the mandible: a case report andA Giant Cell Fibroma and Focal Fibrous Hyperplasia in aFlashPath- Lung - Pulmonary Hyalinizing GranulomaInflammatory vascular diseases | Plastic Surgery KeyPeripheral ameloblastoma of gingiva with cytokeratin 19